Fcgbp – A Potential Viral Trap in RV144



Jacquelyn L Schwartz*
Department of Physiology, University of Manitoba, 745 Bannatyne Ave., Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3E 0J9, Canada


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© Jacquelyn L. Schwartz; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Physiology, University of Manitoba, 745 Bannatyne Ave., Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3E 0J9, Canada; Tel: 204-789-3778; Fax: 204-789-3934; E-mail: jschwar@cc.umanitoba.ca


Abstract

Years of extensive research have yielded much knowledge in many aspects of HIV-1 infection, treatments, and education. However, without a vaccine, the number of people infected worldwide continues to grow. The partial success of the Thai RV144 vaccine trial provides hope that a method of protection is indeed possible. Understanding the mechanism behind the protection is critical if we hope to achieve our goal of inhibiting new infections of HIV-1. We hypothesize that the Fc of IgG binding protein (Fcgbp) is associated with the protection observed in the RV144 vaccine trial. It has the ability to trap viral-antibody complexes in the mucosa by binding the Fc of IgG to Fcgbp. This property could be used in the form of a microbicide containing antibodies to a variety of HIV-1 epitopes to prevent sexual transmission of HIV-1. The aim of this paper is to stimulate further research into Fcgbp and its role in innate immunity.

Keywords: Fcgbp, HIV-1, mechanism, microbicide, vaccine..